Tag Archives: remembering things

Refrigerator Hoarding

Today is a refrigerator triage day. Everything must come out and justify its existence to me or out it goes. This is the only area where I seem to manifest a hoarding behavior. I tend to see left-overs as a potential soup, quiche, or casserole ingredient and thus I have congestion in the fridge. I know a lot of people these days throw out leftovers, but I come from a time and a place where frugality was necessary. It is also the sign of a creative cook to know how to incorporate these ingredients into a delicious second life.

I have stuff in the fridge that I have kept for the same reasons other people keep non-food stuff. For instance, I have two quart jars of homemade pickles given by a friend who preserves garden produce.  I need that space and I know it would take my husband and me three years to use up those two quarts, so out they go. But maybe first I’ll save some of it in smaller jars. My thrift sense kicks in along with an appreciation of the friendship.

Another reason I have kept some of the items is I paid good money for them. I sometimes see an interesting recipe online and bookmark it, but I lack an ingredient or two so I add them to my shopping list and purchase them. The trouble is, my memory doesn’t retain the purpose of the product so I end up with mystery ingredients. I need a system to link food purchases with the recipe they are intended  for.

Memory Systems

My major effort these days is to counter the effect of aging on my short-term memory, and my increasing reluctance to make decisions.

I have come to rely on a system I created that I trust more than my short-term memory. The basic unit of my system is a tickler file. It’s called that because you go through it frequently, your fingers tickling through the dividers for days of the month and months of the year.

Another part of my system is my Bullet Journal. Bullet journaling is very popular right now and it is refreshing to see a non-digital system for recording actions and follow-ups being appreciated by young adults. They see it as their own invention. The name comes from the use of bullet points at the start of items listed in it.

But before I use either my bullet journal or tickler file, I use my commitment-scale. This is an internal process. I consider every thing I have to deal with and ask myself, on a scale of 1 through 10 what is my level of commitment to seeing this through? If an item is a “1” on the scale then it is of no importance. If it is a “10” on the scale it is so important it must be dealt with this moment – right now. “1’s” are not keepers. They go in the trash, the recycling, the donation box, depending on what they are. If an item falls any where else on the scale, then a decision needs to be made about when to do it and where to find it again. If an item is digital,such as an email or a website article, I use Evernote as an online filing system.

The Older Mind May Just Be a Fuller Mind – NYTimes.com

overwhelmedThe Older Mind May Just Be a Fuller Mind – NYTimes.com.

My thoughts exactly:

the larger the library you have in your head, the longer it usually takes to find a particular word (or pair).

Scientists who study thinking and memory often make a broad distinction between “fluid” and “crystallized” intelligence. The former includes short-term memory, like holding a phone number in mind, analytical reasoning, and the ability to tune out distractions, like ambient conversation. The latter is accumulated knowledge, vocabulary and expertise.

I know this is true because my skills as a web-master are very fluid. They flow out of my memory way too fast as I try to figure out what I am doing with my website and setting up a newsletter but recipes which entered long term storage years ago never fail me and everyone thinks I am an intuitive cook.