Energy Tipping Points

Somewhere between youth and old age a tipping point occurred and went unnoticed. Remember when you could burn the candle at both ends with no ill effect? Dance until dawn? Cram all night for an exam? Those were the days, right? In those days the ratio of energy expenditure to energy recovery worked in our favor. Somewhere in middle-age we began to notice the need for some down time for recovery after exertion. By now the need for physical energy is often the determining factor in whether routine things get done. Throw in a major task like clear out the garage / shed /attic and we’re licked before we start. All we can do is work with the energy available to us. Taking stock at the beginning of the day, we can get a sense of how much energy we have. If energy is low, putter. Find minor, routine tasks and get them out of the way. Take a nap. If your energy is abundant, be careful. Don’t use it all up. This kind of a day is an illusion to trap you into three subsequent days of exhaustion following a day of great accomplishment. Take it from One Who Knows.

The Yellow Pie Plate Manifesto

Who Gets Grandma's Yellow Pie Plate? textbook

The best book for family discussions about what needs to be done when handing on personal possessions.

This is for all the “Grandmas” out there who want to be in charge of what happens to their ‘stuff’. You need to be strong in order to wade into the rooms full of accumulations.
Manifesto # 1 – You need to be going through your stuff.
Manifesto # 2 – Sorting is therapy.
Manifesto # 3 – Everything has a story to tell.
Manifesto # 4 – Be kind to yourself… ” No shame – no blame”
Manifesto # 5 – Some people will be unhappy.
Manifesto # 6 – “Fairness” varies.
Manifesto # 7 – It’s Yours, not theirs.

The Older Mind May Just Be a Fuller Mind – NYTimes.com

overwhelmedThe Older Mind May Just Be a Fuller Mind – NYTimes.com.

My thoughts exactly:

the larger the library you have in your head, the longer it usually takes to find a particular word (or pair).

Scientists who study thinking and memory often make a broad distinction between “fluid” and “crystallized” intelligence. The former includes short-term memory, like holding a phone number in mind, analytical reasoning, and the ability to tune out distractions, like ambient conversation. The latter is accumulated knowledge, vocabulary and expertise.

I know this is true because my skills as a web-master are very fluid. They flow out of my memory way too fast as I try to figure out what I am doing with my website and setting up a newsletter but recipes which entered long term storage years ago never fail me and everyone thinks I am an intuitive cook.